GOP Senate hopeful Robert Blaha invokes decades-old Clinton conspiracy theory ahead of primary vote

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    AURORA | With the finish line in sight for the Republican U.S. Senate primary, Colorado Springs businessman Robert Blaha said he felt good about the campaign Monday, June 27, during a Facebook Live broadcast.

    In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Robert Blaha speaks during a debate for the five hopefuls seeking the party's nomination in Tuesday's primary election at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs, Colo. (Jerilee Bennett/The Gazette via AP) MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT
    In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Robert Blaha speaks during a debate for the five hopefuls seeking the party’s nomination in Tuesday’s primary election at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs, Colo. (Jerilee Bennett/The Gazette via AP)

    But during the informal video message, Blaha made reference to a long-circulating conspiracy theory suggesting that Hillary Clinton had something to do with the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vince Foster, who served in President Bill Clinton’s administration.

    The discussion was prompted by talk of a recent CBS poll showing presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump virtually tied with Hillary Clinton in Colorado, with Trump receiving the support of 39 percent of respondents compared to Clinton’s 40 percent.

    Blaha said that voters are familiar with a series of events and scandals often invoked against Clinton: “We know who Hillary Clinton is: Benghazi. Travelgate. Vince Foster. … I could go on and on.”

    Foster, 48, was found dead in Virginia’s Fort Marcy Park on July 20, 1993. Multiple investigations determined he had previously sought help for depression, which had caused him issues with eating, sleeping and ability to focus on his work.

    A 1997 report on Foster’s death by Ken Starr of the Office of Independent Counsel agreed “with the conclusion reached by every official entity that … Foster committed suicide by gunshot.”

    Blaha did not immediately respond to requests for a comment to clarify what precisely he meant by invoking Foster in regards to Clinton and her presidential campaign.

    Foster’s death was recently raised by Trump on the campaign trail. As reported by the Washington Post, Trump in May said the decades-old theory about foul play in Foster’s death were “very serious” and “very fishy.”

    “I will say there are people who continue to bring it up because they think it was absolutely a murder,” Trump said, according to the Post report.

    Shortly after Trump’s comments, Foster’s sister Sheila Foster Anthony penned an editorial for the Post that referred to Trump’s comments as “wrong,” “irresponsible” and “cruel.”

    “For Trump to raise these theories again for political advantage is wrong. I cannot let such craven behavior pass without a response,” Anthony wrote.

    Blaha, in addition to the Foster comment, has been among the most-outspoken Republican Senate candidates in Colorado in terms of supporting Trump.

    Former state representative Jon Keyser, former Aurora councilman Ryan Frazier, El Paso County Commissioner Darryl Glenn and former Colorado State University athletic director Jack Graham also are vying for the GOP nomination in the Senate race. The winner of Tuesday’s primary faces incumbent U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat, in the November general election.